Stories For Ghosts

Horror for the Discerning Fan

Category: Horror Literature (page 1 of 4)

“You are followed.” Interview with C.S. O’Cinneide, Author of Petra’s Ghost

Petra’s Ghost, written by C.S. O’Cinneide, has a U.S. release date of August 13, 2019. It will be published by Dundurn.

Petra’s Ghost starts off with a young widower standing on a windswept hill. He holds a plastic baggie. It is filled with the ashes of his deceased wife, Petra. He has carried her all the way to Spain, to the sun-baked and arduous Camino de Santiago, so he can complete the pilgrimage and scatter her ashes. To say goodbye. It should be easy—find a picturesque spot, open the baggie, and let his wife fall from his fingers.

But it’s not that simple. He feels guilty; he’s the only one who knows how Petra really died, the only one who knows he’s responsible for her death. Now, he keeps seeing strange things. A shadowy figure out of the corner of his eye. The apparition of Petra in broad daylight. She seems to be following him. She seems to be getting closer. The widower knows that, sooner or later, he will have to make peace with Petra. And he’s not the only pilgrim who is haunted by the ghosts of the past.

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“Sometimes, Dead is Bettah.” So Is Pet Sematary, the Novel

When I saw the trailer for Pet Sematary (2019), with John Lithgow as Jud Crandall, I felt excited. I’m usually skeptical of remakes, but since I liked the remake of IT (2017) with Bill Skarsgård as Pennywise the clown, I’m kind of hopeful for upcoming horror remakes. And then it occurred to me: I hadn’t read the book. I’d seen the 1989 film more than 20 times – sometimes just playing it in the background at home while I did chores. I really like the movie,  but I didn’t know what I was missing until I soaked up the novel.

In case you don’t know, Pet Sematary is a story about the Creed family, who moves to Ludlow, Maine, and into a house beside the town’s pet cemetery (misspelled “Sematary” by local children who made the sign). Strange things occur as Louis Creed discovers what lies beyond the Pet Sematary – breaking his grip on sanity and morality.

I had some traveling ahead of me, and I wanted to make sure I read the book before the remake hit theaters. So the night before I headed off to Austin, Texas, for SXSW, I kicked off the Pet Sematary audiobook on my way. As soon as I began the audiobook, I was hooked. I listened during my drive. When I stopped for gas, I didn’t linger so I could finish the next chapter. After a few hours, when I rolled into Austin, I could already tell there were differences between the novel and the 1989 film. But I turned off the audiobook and began live-music-binging.

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Robert Aickman – The Best Horror Writer You’ve Never Heard Of

Editor’s Note: Greetings, dear reader! I am so excited to introduce Stories For Ghosts’ latest contributing writer, David Tobin! David is a longtime horror fan, especially when it comes to horror literature. As such, he thought it would be appropriate to introduce you to Robert Aickman, an incredibly gifted yet underrated writer of strange fiction. Glad to have you, David!

Robert Aickman is the genius of nightmare. His stories create a voiceless dread, feeding on characters and images that are endlessly disturbing. Sooner or later, reading him, you just want to wake up from what feels more and more like a very bad dream:

I caught hold of her left arm by putting both my hands round her wrist, and tried to lug her up toward me, so that I could feel her thrown against me, and could cover her neck and front with kisses, if only she could make me want to … I gave this great, bad-tempered, disappointed pull … She came up towards me and then fell back again with a sort of wail. I was still holding on to her hand and wrist … What had happened was that I had pulled her left hand and wrist right off.

“The Swords” (1975) From Cold Hand In Mine
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15 Scary Good Horror Novels for Your 2019 Reading List

I don’t know about you, but every year I make a resolution to read more horror novels. I experience varying levels of success each year (because life happens). Not that it stops me from buying more and more horror novels and adding to my already out-of-control horror novel collection.

Sigh. There are just too many intriguing horror novels out there, and so little time.

But I feel optimistic about this year! Really, I do. I am making a concerted push to read more in general, especially when it comes to my beloved horror genre. Just as I saw in 2017 and 2018, this year will see the publication of a ton of cool horror novels and novellas, so I certainly won’t have any problems finding good options. Choosing among them will be a different story, however.

All in all, there are 15 horror novels that have caught my eye so far, with something for everyone. Specifically, I’m interested in Caitlin R. Kiernan’s latest haunting short story collection, The Very Best of Caitlin R. Kiernan; Josh Malerman’s new dystopic vision, Inspection; the gothic-inspired nightmare PEtra’s Ghost by C.S. O’Cinneide; Grady Hendrix’s delightful-sounding My Mom’s Book Club Killed Dracula; and the arresting A Lush and Seething Hell by John Hornor Jacobs.

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Totally Rad, Man: My Best Friend’s Exorcism Review

When I first heard about Grady Hendrix’s novel My Best Friend’s Exorcism, marketed as a cross between Heathers and The Exorcist, I just knew I had to read it. I love 80s nostalgia as much as the next person (since I am just barely a child of the 80s). I also love making fun of the 80s, what with the awful clothes and hair, the rampant and self-conscious conservatism, and the general tackiness.

And sure enough, My Best Friend’s Exorcism pays homage to this decade as much as it pokes fun at it. More than that though this novel is heartfelt and creepy, treading into the well-worn territory of fraught adolescent relationships. The result is a book whose nostalgia runs deeper than the pop culture references it deploys throughout.

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Just in Time for Halloween – 13 Fall 2018 Horror Novels

Do you hear that? It’s the sound of Halloween approaching, which means it’s time to start choosing your horror novels for autumn. You only have 75 days left to pick a scary read!

With so many horror novels out there, it can be hard to choose. Don’t worry though, because I always come prepared with great recommendations. If you’re looking for a horror classic to curl up with, I got you covered with my Classic Spooky Reads or Modern Horror Classics post. If you’re looking for a unique female voice to keep you up at night, my female horror writer litspo post is worth a look. And you can always check out my blog on new horror releases from the first half of 2018.

Even better news—I noticed that tons of intriguing, spooky sounding horror novels were slated for release in the latter half of 2018. Since I hadn’t covered any of these books in my previous post, I thought they merited a whole new post, and just in time for those of us looking to find the perfect scary fall read.

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Stephen King’s The Outsider – a Solid, Creepy Summer Read

*Mild spoilers for The Outsider*

Like any horror fan (and latchkey kid raised by TV), I love Stephen King. The prolific master of horror has done so much to entertain and terrify readers for over forty years. I’ll never forget what it was like to read Carrie for the first time or to tackle It, and his books have influenced much of my own storytelling. While not every King novel is a success, I learn something new from everyone I read. Accordingly, when I heard about his latest novel, The Outsider, I didn’t think twice about including it on my list of most anticipated horror novels of 2018 to eagerly await its publication. Continue reading

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The 20 Days of Turin – A Surreal and Timely Nightmare

Recently I found the time to finally read one of my most anticipated novels of 2017, The 20 Days of Turin by Giorgio De Maria. This novel was hyped as a cult classic, a prime example of Italian weird fiction that had finally been given the treatment owed to a cult classic and translated into English. Reviews and publisher blurbs hailed it as a horrifying tale that, despite being published almost forty years ago, had proven just as timely and significant as ever.

With such endorsements, I didn’t really know what to expect, since I have never read any Italian weird fiction, and the closest thing to Italian horror I’ve read was Dante’s Inferno. But the synopsis was intriguing, the cover was creepy, and I thought, what the heck?

The 20 Days of Turin turned out to be more complicated than I had anticipated. It’s part Lovecraftian horror story, part political allegory, part mystery thriller, and part sublime nightmare. This novel is a very good example of the kind of horror that focuses less on jump scares and more on weaving an insidious scheme to ensnare its reader.

Ensnare me it did. The 20 Days of Turin didn’t scare me in a way that forced me to make sure my doors and windows were locked. But it burrowed its way under my skin, and I can’t stop thinking about it.

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12 of My Fave Modern Horror Novels For Spooky Reading

One of my personal favorite parts about Halloween is that my friends and family really like to get into the spooky spirit. I am always in a spooky mood, and it brings my cold black heart joy to see my loved ones come visit me over here on the dark side. They ask me for recommendations for movies, TV shows, and books, the latter of which I absolutely love to give since I am a huge lit nerd.

I’ve done this before in my Classic Spooky Read post from last Halloween. If you are interested in picking up am iconic horror masterpiece like Frankenstein, or Dracula, or The Haunting of Hill House, now is the perfect time! But if you want something newer, a little fresher and more contemporary, then you should check out my list of 12 modern horror novel favorites.

Enjoy!

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12 Scary Banned or Challenged Books You Loved as a Kid

The 35th annual Banned Books Week is winding down, and this year, countless readers have enjoyed the myriad of books that have faced challenges and suffered bans in the United States. Founded in 1982 by the Banned Books Week Coalition, Banned Books week aims to document and raise awareness of book censorship in America. The Coalition also wants to start and sustain a dialogue within communities, between concerned parents, libraries, and publishers to address book censorship.

After revisiting my favorite challenged children’s series , I wanted to document the scary books that have touched children’s lives and garnered challenges in the U.S. I’m a firm believer that scary, age-appropriate stories do a lot of good for young children by making their fears and anxieties manageable and recognizable. I also believe that it’s a “tragic mistake to deprive a child of a book that will allow them to face and discuss the things that make them afraid. Repressing those fears only makes them more afraid.”

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