Stories For Ghosts

Horror for the Discerning Fan

Tag: The Shape of Water

Horror Movies and TV Shows at the Golden Globes

It’s time for the Golden Globes!

First given in 1944, the Golden Globes are widely regarded as the official kick-off of Hollywood’s awards season. The Golden Globes are prestigious, given to the best in both Film and Television, which makes the Golden Globes a sort of hybrid between the Emmys and the Oscars. Unlike its big sister, the Oscars, the Golden Globes split the film categories into “Drama” and “Musical or Comedy” while eschewing categories for technical achievements, like cinematography and editing. The Golden Globes are focused on big names and talent, which ensures that a lot of beautiful people show up to the ceremony and a lot of people tune in to watch. (Also, they serve dinner and tons of booze during the ceremony, which means lots of drunk people. Always good for ratings!)

So while Hollywood doesn’t regard the Golden Globes as prestigious as the Oscars, Hollywood does see the Golden Globes as an opportunity to recognize achievement from a larger group of films. More importantly, the Golden Globes take place before the Academy announces Oscar nominations and give a sharp insight into who the Academy might choose to recognize that year.

You’d think that would have translated into more and more horror films receiving recognition, but alas, that hasn’t happened.

This year, however, The Shape of Water and Get Out are both nominated in film, with Stranger Things and Twin Peaks receiving some nominations in television. It’s heartening to see such recognition, especially for Get Out, which is more of a straight horror movie than The Shape of Water, but no less carefully and expertly made.

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My Faves, Surprises, Disappointments – 2017 Horror Movies

2017 may have sucked in a lot of ways, but 2017 was a great year for horror. From clear standouts like Get Out to darkhorse surprises like Split, I enjoyed a great deal of 2017 horror. Even the not-so-great horror films failed to make me want to claw my face off.

Admittedly, I avoided tragic and terrible movies like Rings and Wish Upon because I didn’t need to pay to know they sucked. And I didn’t see every single horror 2017 film because, as I mentioned, 2017 was a difficult year.

At any rate, I’ve identified five movies in three categories—Favorites, Surprises, and Disappointments. Do my ratings match up with yours?
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December Horror – Guillermo del Toro Goes for Oscar Gold

Gosh, is it already December 2017? Have we already been through eleven months’ worth of horror movies with only December horror left?

Time flies, doesn’t it?

We’ve been through a ton of horror movies this year of varying levels of quality. It only seems consistent that December horror would go the same route. I’ve been waiting for The Shape of Water for what feels like ages, which, if it’s as good as everyone says, will make a great year-end triumph for the genre. December horror also has some indie gems, like Desolation. But there’s also the forgettable Slumber to contend with.

It’s really Guillermo del Toro’s month for horror, for sure.

Horror is always a mixed bag, and it seems like this December Horror list is no different.

Let’s get to it.

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All the Must-See Horror Movies at TIFF 2017

The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) continues the 2017 film festival season in style! And with tons of horror movies!

Thank God! I was getting a little parched with the paltry (though potent) slates of horror movies at Cannes and Venice.

Honestly, it’s not a surprise that TIFF has much more horror than the other festivals. TIFF has always been a little more…risky than some of the more prestigious festivals. Not that TIFF isn’t prestigious–it regularly attracts top-level talent and Oscar contenders. It’s just that TIFF is a little more daring. A little more willing to recognize the worth and artistic accomplishments of genre films.

As Vox put it, “Cannes films often skew toward more rarefied and international films, while at Toronto…you can find bigger crowdpleasers that might also find more money at the box office and wind up bigger awards-season contenders…TIFF sets the pace for the year’s awards chatter.”

And just to underscore the point, TIFF regularly hits homeruns, especially in horror. TIFF has debuted such horror films as Dario Argento’s Opera in 1989, Peter Jackson’s Braindead in 1992, The Grudge in 2002, Hostel in 2005,  Inside (À l’intérieur) in 2007, 2008’s The Loved Ones, Black Swan in 2009, The Lords of Salem in 2012, Emilie in 2015, and Raw in 2016, where multiple people passed out during the screening.

Thus, without further adieu, let’s get to TIFF 2017’s horror movies!

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Horror Films at the 2017 Venice International Film Festival

Film Festival season continues with the venerated and show-stopping Venice International Film Festival. The Venice International Film Festival is the oldest film festival in the world, founded in 1932. Venice reigns alongside the Cannes Film Festival and the Berlin International Film Festival as the three most important film festivals in the world. Kings are made, stars are born, and buzz-worthy films live or die by the reaction they garner at Venice.

As one of the most important film festivals in the world, Venice has done its fair share to elevate horror films of artistic merit and critical acclaim. The very first film ever screened at Venice in 1932 was Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, directed by Rouben Mamoulian. In more recent years, Venice showcased Survival of the Dead (2009), Black Swan (2010), Under the Skin (2013), and The Bad Batch (2016).

And this year, Venice has two of the most highly anticipated horror movies on its slate – Darren Aronofsky’s mother! and Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water. It doesn’t get much more art-house horror than these two, and I am dying of anticipation.

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