Stories For Ghosts

Literary Horror for Everyone

Category: Psychological Horror (page 1 of 7)

The Opulent, Violent Beauty of Suspiria: An Appreciation Post

1977 was a damn good year for cinema with the release of modern film classics like Star Wars, Saturday Night Fever, Annie Hall, and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It was also an inspired year for horror, with The Hills Have Eyes, Eraserhead, Rabid, and, of course, Dario Argento’s masterpiece, Suspiria. One of the most iconic horror films ever, Suspiria enjoyed the 40th anniversary of its world premiere a few months ago. Just a few days ago, it enjoyed the 40th anniversary of its American release.

Suspiria is one of my favorite horror movies. Full stop. Not only is it violent and horrifying, it’s freakin’ gorgeous. Gory and unsettling, its visuals are beautiful and opulent. Suspiria is a true experience, more than a straightforward movie-watching experience. Like the giallo movies from which Suspiria is descended, the film explores the stunning effect of horrific violence rendered cinematic. Of all the giallo films, Suspiria achieves a rare kind of horror movie sublimity, slipping into your subconscious like a long, thin blade. Continue reading

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Horror at the 2017 Melbourne International Film Festival

As part of my ongoing series, Horror at Film Festivals, let’s take a trip down under to Australia for the Melbourne International Film Festival. The world isn’t just about Cannes and Sundance, now is it?

The Melbourne International Film Festival is chock full of horror spanning a wide range of tastes from the gory to the eerie to the downright weird. From August 3rd to August 20th, the film industry will gather in Melbourne to toast the latest crop of inventive and important films, and horror films part of the schedule.

As a festival, the Melbourne International Film Festival aims to show the global audience all manner of “curated and unforgettable screen experiences.” The major Australian film festival, the Melbourne International Film Festival is also one of the oldest film festivals in the world, showcasing films since 1952. It has a decidedly different flavor to its film lineup, focusing on daring, a little risky, slightly off-kilter independent films.

To that end, the Melbourne International Film Festival has showcased works by horror icons Dario Argento, David Cronenberg, and David Lynch, among many. More recently, the Melbourne International Film Festival screened such horror films as Housebound, Train to Busan, and What We Do in the Shadows.

The lineup for 2017 is exciting! Melbourne International Film Festival has one of the most extensive slates of indie horror I’ve seen at a major festival. I can’t wait until I can see these in America!

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July 2017 Horror Movies: A Low-Key Month

While the dead of summer is when we expect many of the big action blockbusters, the same cannot be said of horror movies this year. July 2017 horror movies are a bit low key this month, though not without some interesting entries. There are three movies that showed at the Sundance Film Festival back in January. There’s one mainstream summer scary movie. And, as always, there are quite a few low-budget, low-profile horror flicks rounding out the July 2017 horror movies. It’s definitely a mixed bag, but with movies like Killing Ground and It Stains the Sands Red, there’s hope for horror this month, despite the appearance of Wish Upon.

If nothing else, it will be only a few short weeks until The Dark Tower, Annabelle: Creation, and Polaroid!

Enjoy.

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June Horror Movies 2017 – Heavy Hitters and Indie Flicks

Woohoo! June horror movies are here! There’s a lot this month, so strap in and buckle up because there’s wide array of films. There’s different subgenres, different levels of quality, and different levels of WTF-ness.

I need to apologize as well, because I’ve been traveling the last few days, which delayed my normal blog post schedule. Basically, I was traveling and boozing it up. Consequently, I wrote a lot of this in the Houston airport after drinking several glasses of overpriced wine (#noregrets). I am truly a Hemingway fan and wrote drunk and edited sober.

Can I just say that this was very fun to edit this? It was a challenge.

But anyway! Here’s your June Horror Movie list! You didn’t miss much from my post being late. Ooops!

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Horror Movies at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival

It’s time for the annual Cannes Film Festival! And that means there’s a whole new crop of Cannes horror films!

Cannes is one of the renowned and distinguished film festivals in the world, attracting talent and glitz from all over. The festival has proven itself to be an important predictor of award-winning and groundbreaking films. Among all those storied films, composed of equal parts Oscar-bait and innovative indies, are some of the best horror movies.

As I pointed out in last year’s post, films like It Follows, Green Room, Possession, and Evil Dead were all shown at Cannes. Cannes has always recognized good films, even if they do happen to be horror films.

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Call Your Mother, Then Watch These Horror Movies for Mother’s Day

One of the most popular horror movie trope is the Bad, Scary Mother. It’s not just horror movies that love to trot out a fearsome mother figure. Norma Bates wasn’t the first controlling, abusive mother to terrify her children, and she won’t be the last. Medea, Cinderella’s evil stepmother, Cersai Lannister—human culture and literature has countless examples of maternal figures that are selfish, manipulative, and downright evil. These figures are powerful because they fly in the face of our ideal image of what a mother should be.

And what should a mother be? This Mother’s Day, like all others, we will celebrate our mothers for their nurturing natures, for how loving and supportive and selfless and kind they’ve been to us. We will post cute vintage pictures of our mothers, young and bright-eyed, holding colorful little bundles of joy on their laps. We will send them flowers, buy them nice gifts, bring them chocolates, and wait on them hand and foot. They have given so much to us, we will say. They’ve sacrificed so much for us. They’ve been good mothers.

Does a bad mother fail to do all of that? Is that how easy it is to tell who is a good mommy and who is a bad mommy?

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May 2017 Horror Movies: Indie Flicks, Ridley Scott Tries Again

Lord, I’m dying of thirst over here! Where are all the summer horror movies?

There’s only one major, wide-release movie coming out in all of May 2017! That movie is Alien: Covenant, which I feel like I should be more excited about. If only I could get over my feelings about Prometheus. The other releases are all extremely limited releases that provide an interesting look into the state of indie horror movies. Another Evil and Berlin Syndrome are two film festival darlings. 7 Witches and Dead Awake seem like very low-budget horror movies, but not without their potential.

So while I am scrapping the bottom of the barrel with this month, there’s some good stuff here.

Check ‘em out!

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All the Freshest Horror Films at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival

The Tribeca Film Festival starts tomorrow! The film festival circuit is in full swing and Tribeca is the latest prestigious stop. And I’m going to tell you all about the featured horror films.

Tribeca may not be Cannes, but in its relatively short existence, Tribeca has proven itself a formidable and important film festival. Founded in 2002 by producer Jane Rosenthal, renowned actor Robert De Niro, and real estate mogul Craig Hatkoff, Tribeca has made a name for itself as a festival dedicated to presenting discerning and innovative filmmaking. More than the Cannes Film Festival or the Toronto International Film Festival, Tribeca is about independent films over “prestige studio movies.”

This year, there’s a great mix of various horror subgenres, from serial killer movies to artistic slashers to psychological horror, with loads of films falling between those categories or smashing through them. I have a feeling that some of these feature and short films will go on to generate plenty of buzz. Hopefully, we will see general releases of some of these. I’m particularly excited about Hounds of LovePsychopaths, and Retouch.

Enjoy!

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Raw Film Review: Julia Ducournau’s Voracious Triumph

*Beware: Here be mild spoilers for Raw*

During my time blogging about all things horror, I’ve found that most serious horror fans by and large stick to their favorite horror subgenres. They may only dapple in other subgenres, occasionally dipping a toe into art horror or zombie flicks, but not often. I do this. I love moody, tense psychological horror, ghost stories, and taut thrillers with elegant displays of horrific violence. Slashers? Not really my thing. The Saw movies? Ehhh, pass. And body horror? Definitely not my thing.

For some reason, body horror is particularly challenging for me. Thus, I avoid it. This isn’t to say that I think body horror is bad or uncouth or less capable of artistic potential. I accept the importance of body horror as a subgenre that is, at times, most-equipped to explore themes like mortality, physical weakness, aging and disease, over-population, and the disconnect between our mental power and our bodily strength. After all, body horror is the most universal kind of horror, since everyone is stuck in a decaying body and marches through a field of pain and pleasure towards death.

There are times when even I can’t look away from a well-done, brilliant body horror film, when even I have to admit that I really, really liked it.

This is how I felt about Raw, a 2016 French-Belgian cannibalism and coming of age horror film that made waves at Cannes last year and was finally released stateside a few weeks ago.

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April 2017 Horror – Limited Releases With Tons of Creepy Imagination

Well, we’re in the full film festival swing of things, which means that there is an exciting new crop of horror movies up for distribution rights! But this also means that, as far as a wide-release calendar goes, there isn’t much to see this April.

In fact, while this month’s slate of horror movies is refreshingly inventive, it’s going to be difficult for anyone to see these outside of major movie markets like New York and Los Angeles. I’m particularly sad about scrounging for a screening of sci-fi existential body horror flick The Void, praying for a showing of the macabre and witchy A Dark Song, and wishing for a chance to see Voice from the Stone, despite my misgivings.

However, many of these movies will be available on VOD shortly after their limited runs, so you won’t have to wait so long!

Enjoy!

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