Stories For Ghosts

Horror for the Discerning Fan

Category: Horror Films (page 2 of 13)

My List of Most Anticipated Horror Films for 2019

A new year, a new slate of horror movies to anticipate. This year, as with nearly every year, there are so many horror films to choose from. And as with every year, there are some movies that look DOA (like La Llorona, which looks so cheesy) as well as some films that will blow us all away (Jordan Peele’s Us looks way intense, I’m ready but so unprepared at the same time).

That being said, this year’s anticipated horror list includes a whole lot of sequels (4 total) and remakes (2 total). 2019 is the year of Stephen King, as his stories have inspired THREE of the fourteen movies on my list. But there’s also a fair bit of original content, like Us, Brightburn, and Ma.

I’m just so excited to see all of these. As always, stay tuned for my reviews of these films! Enjoy!

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January 2019 Horror Movies – Not a Bad Way to Start the Year

Happy New Year to all you horror fans out there!

I don’t know about you, but 2018 was kind of an amazing year for horror. There were a lot of original titles and a fair bit of inventive stuff. Of course, each month we saw many of the same old bad horror movie titles, with shoddy special effects, unimaginative jump scares, and laughable acting. Despite the highs we experienced in 2018, it appeared that each month would bring an endless stream of subpar horror movies.

I went into this month’s horror movie calendar feeling the same way. 2019 would be, largely, the same, and all I could do was hope we’d have the same caliber of cool horror movies as in 2018.

But then! These January 2019 horror trailers weren’t that bad. Some of them were actually, dare I say, interesting? Take Rust Creek, which might be a more sophisticated execution of your typical redneck survival horror movie. Or Pledge, which promises to unleash a whole frat of Patrick Bateman psychopaths on a group of unsuspecting underclassmen. And then, of course, there’s Glass, which isn’t really a full horror film, but by God, James McAvoy’s Beast character creeps me the hell out.

There’s also the notable horror DVD releases this month—Halloween will hit Amazon on January 15, followed by Suspiria on January 29. Both of these 2018 horror films are solid choices, so check them out.

And enjoy this month’s new horror releases!

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My Christmas Wishlist for Horror Movies to Remake

“Remake”—the very word inspires the most dramatic of eye rolls for horror fans. That’s because so many horror remakes are unnecessary. All too often, remakes are based on films that were wonderfully crafted, and some producer somewhere is trying to make a quick buck by dragging a good movie’s legacy through the mud.

Seriously, how frustrating is it when a solid, well-made horror classic, like 1982’s Poltergeist, gets remade? Poltergeist didn’t need a remake! And if someone just had to remake it, couldn’t they have created something better than the 2015 remake?

But then, again, how cool is it when a horror remake actually adds to or improves upon the original horror film? As much as I love Dario Argento’s Suspiria, it has its flaws. Luckily, the remake of Suspiria paid homage to the original, avoided copying the original’s aesthetic, and dove deep into the plot. What resulted was an original film that preserved the original’s legacy and stood on its own.

Or take the most recent news about the remake of Candyman, a good film that could have been great. It’s set to be produced by Jordan Peele and promises to dig into the power of the Candyman mythos against the backdrop of the now-gentrified area where the Cabrini-Green housing projects once stood. With Peele at the helm, I’m optimistic that this remake will cover a lot of new ground when it comes to racism and class differences, which is sadly very relevant.

That got me thinking—what are some other horror films that deserve a remake? What are some films that were good but not great, full of potential that shouldn’t be wasted? For whatever reason, be it a shoe-string budget, uneven writing, or production troubles, tons of horror movies never reached their full potential despite having most of the parts to do so.

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Round Out 2018 With These December Horror Movies

Gosh, can you believe it’s December, and we’ve got nearly a year’s worth of horror movies behind us? From A Quiet Place to Hereditary to Halloween, we’ve seen horror movies make waves. We’ve also heard from quite a few quieter horror movies, like Unsane, Mandy, and Annihilation. All in all, it’s been a compelling year for horror with a lot of very creative and innovative films, but also a good amount of the same kind of mediocrity we’ve seen before.

And December 2018 is no exception. This month serves up a short but punchy list of horror movies. The recent trend of Christmas horror anthologies (love) continues with All the Creatures Was Stirring. We’re subjected to an ill-timed holiday horror film in Leprechaun Returns. Lars von Trier does his sexual and violent is-he-a-misogynist-and-if-he-is-does-does-he-at-least-feel-bad-about-it act with The House that Jack Built. And Netflix, as dependable as ever, gives us an early Christmas gift in the form of the film adaptation of Josh Malerman’s frightening, taut horror-thriller Bird Box.

Not a bad month all around, considering.

Enjoy!

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Suspiria Review: A Mesmerizing Reflection on Abuses of Power

*Warning: Some Spoilers for Suspiria*

When I walked out of the theater after watching Luca Guadagnino’s remake of Suspiria, I didn’t know what to think. I didn’t know how to feel. I didn’t know if I liked the movie or if I hated it. Oh sure, there was plenty of horrific elements and beautiful dance scenes and provocative imagery, but did I enjoy it? Was it a good movie?

And then I realized that I felt the same way after watching Dario Argento’s original Suspiria. I had to laugh. Even though the remake of Suspiria is a wholly independent film that stands on its own, it reminded me of the original in more than one way. Beyond the purposefully muted visual palate, the expanded plot, and the exploration of themes, Guadagnino’s Suspiria creates a similarly enigmatic and overwhelming horror film that compliments Argento’s work.

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November Horror: Suspiria, Overlord, and A Christmas-Themed Zombie Musical

It’s officially November, which means that we’ve got a whole new slate of horror movies to discuss while steadily munching on leftover candy.

The months after October were usually devoid of quality (or even interesting) horror movies because the holiday season is the domain of awards seasons hopefuls. But that’s changed in recent years as more and more studios realize there is a year-round audience for horror.

As such, there’s a not-terrible slate of horror movies to choose from this November. Based on trailers alone, highlights include Luca Guadagnino’s stylish remake of Dario Argento’s classic Suspiria, WWII occult-horror Overlord, and zombie-musical-comedy Anna and the Apocalypse. (I’ve been waiting for that last one since I first learned about it at FantasticFest 2017! I never knew how badly I wanted a Christmas-themed zombie musical until then.) But November also has a large number of stinkers, like The Amityville Murders (can they stop with this franchise already? Lord have mercy), The Farm, and The Possession of Hannah Grace.

Enjoy, and let me know what you think in the comments!

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Apostle: A Promising Religious Horror That Should’ve Been a Miniseries

Every once in a while, a horror movie comes along that blows away audiences and critics alike. These films are nearly flawless, making perfect use of scares, genre conventions, plotting, character development, cinematography, and score to weave a bewitching triumph of filmmaking that both expands and transcends the genre.

Unfortunately, Netflixs’s Apostle is not one of these films. But damn, I had fun watching it!

Inspired by British religious horror classics The Wicker Man and The Devils, Apostle admirably bites off more than it can chew. Ambitious and thoughtful, it is a gory, thrilling film that needed more space to breathe to achieve horror greatness.

I get into a lot of spoilers here, so be warned. But that shouldn’t stop you from checking out Apostle.

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Famous Actors Who Got Their Start in Horror Movies

Few things make me happier than finding one of my favorite actors starring in an old horror movie. The cheesier and more awful the movie, the better I enjoy the newbie actor’s performance. It’s comforting to know that these rich and famous actors, all at the top of their industry, started at the bottom like everybody else.

For a genre that doesn’t get much respect, horror consistently delivers new talent. Many of today’s A-Listers got their start in low-budget and shoddy horror films, while others were a little luckier with their early roles.

I figured, being as it’s Halloween time, I should pay homage to their early roles. First, it shows you just how much, um, range, some of these actors have (or not). Second, it’s fun to wonder how their careers would have been different had they not been Classroom Girl #1 in Urban Legends: Bloody Mary

There’s also something so delightful about knowing that Tom Hanks, one of my favorite actors, started his acting career in a horror/thriller with terrible dialogue and ATROCIOUS acting, as evidenced by this clip.

If nothing else, I hope you enjoy this list for its Bad Movie Night potential. Seriously, I’ve never seen Leprechaun or Hellraiser: Hell World (what an amazing title!).

So, without further adieu, here is a list of 20 actors who saw their film debut in horror, followed by 20 actors who had early roles in some “iconic” horror films.

Enjoy!

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October 2018 Horror Movies: Netflix to the Rescue

I have to be honest…I’m disappointed in the slate of horror movies for October 2018.

Shouldn’t the movie release calendar for October be overflowing with horror movies? I’m not even asking for good horror movies. I’ll take them all–well-made, shoddily-made, solid casts, bad acting, inventive premises, uninspired ripoffs–I don’t care.

Where are all the horror movies?

I suppose I should be thankful for the movies we have. After all, the latest Halloween comes out this month, and I could not be more excited! Netflix’s Apostle and indie film The Dark also look like great contenders for worthwhile horror.

In fact, I’m just going to spend a lot of my time on Netflix this Halloween. Between Apostle and Netflix’s new series, The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina and The Haunting of Hill House,  Netflix seems like a sure bet for horror.

That’s not to say you shouldn’t check out the rest of the horror offerings this month. Maybe just…temper your expectations.

Enjoy!

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Revisiting Night of the Living Dead, 50 Years Later

The horror genre is littered with controversial films, films that inspired censorship and protests and extreme backlash. While controversy is certainly good for box office takes, it’s not always good for the critical interpretation of a film. Horror fans, especially, know that controversy does not always merit the backlash our favorite genre films receive. A violent or unsettling or difficult movie doesn’t mean it’s bad—sometimes, it means that the film has done its job.

Night of the Living Dead, George A. Romero’s 1968 black-and-white exploitation classic, is one such film. What modern audiences see as an undisputed but perhaps dated work of essential horror, contemporary audiences were shocked and appalled by Night of the Living Dead. It was violent! It was gory! It tested the very boundaries of decency!

Despite its critical success, the movie simply did not deserve to exist, according to some critics. As the Variety review put it, “Until the Supreme Court establishes clear-cut guidelines for the pornography of violence, Night of the Living Dead will serve nicely as an outer-limit definition by example.”

But it’s precisely because of those outer-limits that films like Night of the Living Dead are essential. They ask us to question art, to question the way we tell stories. They force us to consider uncomfortable implications of what we’re seeing onscreen. In short, they ask what deserves to be committed to film and why.

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