Stories For Ghosts

Horror for the Discerning Fan

Category: Gothic Horror (page 1 of 6)

Apostle: A Promising Religious Horror That Should’ve Been a Miniseries

Every once in a while, a horror movie comes along that blows away audiences and critics alike. These films are nearly flawless, making perfect use of scares, genre conventions, plotting, character development, cinematography, and score to weave a bewitching triumph of filmmaking that both expands and transcends the genre.

Unfortunately, Netflixs’s Apostle is not one of these films. But damn, I had fun watching it!

Inspired by British religious horror classics The Wicker Man and The Devils, Apostle admirably bites off more than it can chew. Ambitious and thoughtful, it is a gory, thrilling film that needed more space to breathe to achieve horror greatness.

I get into a lot of spoilers here, so be warned. But that shouldn’t stop you from checking out Apostle.

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All the Fresh Horror Films at Fantastic Fest 2018

Festival season continues its steady momentum of exciting new horror movies this week at Fantastic Fest 2018. Held in Austin, Texas, Fantastic Fest is the largest genre film festival in the United States, which if you want a sneak peek of upcoming horror films sure to delight and shock, you pay attention to Fantastic Fest.

In Fantastic Fest’s own words, “The festival is dedicated to championing challenging and thought-provoking cinema, celebrating new voices and new stories from around the world and supporting new filmmakers. We are committed to supporting film in its most provocative, ground-breaking and lesser-known forms and giving the audience a chance to find new favorites and future genre classics.”

In the past, Fantastic Fest has screened horror films such as Zombieland, SplitDark SongThe Void, The Witch, We Are What We Are, It FollowsThe Babadook, and Sinister. Last year, Fantastic Fest screened The EndlessGerald’s Game, and Revenge, among others.

Essentially, Fantastic Fest is legit. And the list of horror films is long! There are 31 horror films total at Fantastic Fest! (It’s a sign!)

Even better, this year’s Fantastic Fest seems especially committed to showcasing horror films from all over the world–Argentina, Belgium, Chile, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Luxembourg, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and Tunisia, to be exact. For horror fans like me, the chance to learn about new foreign horror is thrilling, especially when mainstream American horror fails to deliver.

Without further adieu, let’s check out what Fantastic Fest has to offer! Continue reading

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Honoring Underworld on Its 15th Anniversary

I rail a lot against bad horror movies, the kind that are excuses to inflict a lot of violence, gore, and bad writing on audiences. As a horror fan, I wish to hold the genre to a certain standard of storytelling because the genre has so much to offer. But I’m realistic, and if a horror movie doesn’t live up to those standards (or even try), all I ask is that it’s at least entertaining. There’s nothing worse than a boring horror movie that tries way too hard.

However, I must confess that I have my own horror guilty pleasures. These are films that I acknowledge are poorly made movies with a laundry list of flaws. Yet somehow, I love them. I watch them over and over.

And my favorite horror guilty pleasure is 2003’s action-horror classic Underworld.

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September 2018 Horror – Attack of the Sequels and Some Indie Flicks

Do you feel that change in the air? In Texas, it’s no longer 100 degrees every day, and the mornings almost feel…pleasant? It must be fall!

Now that summer is drawing to a close, we’re less than 60 days out from Halloween! That means we’re about to get a whole slew of horror movies in anticipation of our favorite holiday.

And boy, does September deliver a bunch of horror movies. The quality of these movies varies, but there are some exciting choices here, like Nic Cage’s metal-horror Mandy and the religious-horror film Don’t Leave Home. Due to a crowded October release schedule, we also get a lot of big-name horror films this month, like sequels The Nun and The Predator. There’s also The House with a Clock in Its Walls, which might go on to become a kids’ horror classic.

Let’s get to it!

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Horror at the 2018 Venice International Film Festival

The Venice International Film Festival officially kicks off today, serving as one of the most important stops on the film festival circuit. Venice is one of the three most influential film festivals in the world, up there with Cannes and Berlin. As such, films showcased at Venice are regarded as being the crème de la crème, as prestigious films that aim to elevate the medium of film.

Of course, horror films are often overlooked. But not always.

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Just in Time for Halloween – 13 Fall 2018 Horror Novels

Do you hear that? It’s the sound of Halloween approaching, which means it’s time to start choosing your horror novels for autumn. You only have 75 days left to pick a scary read!

With so many horror novels out there, it can be hard to choose. Don’t worry though, because I always come prepared with great recommendations. If you’re looking for a horror classic to curl up with, I got you covered with my Classic Spooky Reads or Modern Horror Classics post. If you’re looking for a unique female voice to keep you up at night, my female horror writer litspo post is worth a look. And you can always check out my blog on new horror releases from the first half of 2018.

Even better news—I noticed that tons of intriguing, spooky sounding horror novels were slated for release in the latter half of 2018. Since I hadn’t covered any of these books in my previous post, I thought they merited a whole new post, and just in time for those of us looking to find the perfect scary fall read.

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The Good, The Bad, and The Weird – August Horror Releases

There are a ton of new August horror releases this month, and a wide variety at that! That’s what I’m talking about! This broad array of new horror is what I’ve been missing from the last few months—a mix of big-budget wide releases, artsy indie flicks, and some bizarre low-budget films.

I’m excited for zombie-apocalypse film Patient Zero, as well as the moody, ghostly gothic thriller The Little Stranger. And of course, I can’t wait to see The Meg, because who doesn’t love a ridiculous action-horror movie about sharks?

Check out all of the August horror releases below! Enjoy!

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2018 June Horror Movies – I Really Only Care About Hereditary

You guys. I can’t believe how short the June horror movie slate is this month! I mean, don’t you think you’d want to spread your summer horror releases out? Guess not, because June is sparse this month. There are only two major theatrical releases and a few VOD releases.

Though, to be fair, June horror has the incendiary Hereditary, fresh off the indie festival circuit and burning up the internet with tons of critical acclaim. That alone makes up for the shortage of other major horror titles and the duds rounding out June horror movies, like The Toybox and Ghostland. So I guess we can call it even?

There’s always July, when The First Purge and The Nun come out!

In the meantime, check out these trailers.

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5 Mexican Horror Movies for Cinco De Mayo!

Happy Cinco de Mayo! In honor of Cinco de Mayo and Mexico’s unique artistic contributions to horror films, I’ve compiled a list of five awesome Mexican horror movies!

But before I get into the horror movies, let’s talk about the history behind Cinco de May. In case you didn’t know, May 5, 2018, is the 156th anniversary of the Mexican Army’s defeat of the French at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862. Long story short, Napoleon III wanted to take advantage of Mexico’s financially weakened position at the time and force Mexico to be a “dependent empire” to benefit French interests. Of course, Mexico was not having it, and they put up a fight. After France gained the early advantage, Mexico rallied and secured a massive victory, both strategically and morally, since the French soldiers were vastly better equipped and outnumbered the Mexicans 2 to 1.

So, just remember that when you’re throwing back margaritas and watching horror movies. These Mexican horror movies are scary, intense, and creative, combining elements of ghost stories, exploitation, and the magical realism for which Mexican horror is known.

Cheers!

mexican horror

El Espejo de la Bruja (1962) (The Witch’s Mirror)

In El Espejo de la Bruja, a witch schemes to avenge the murder of goddaughter at the hands of her husband, who then wastes no time in remarrying a clueless woman. And it doesn’t stop with the death of one woman—this film trades in dead women, which is interesting considering who the murderer is. The film creates a successful mix of classic gothic tropes, borrowing everything from Rebecca to Edgar Allan Poe to Eyes Without a Face. As a result, El Espejo de la Bruja is a moody, atmospheric horror film with sinister visuals, schlocky plot developments, and scares of varying effectiveness.

mexican horror

Alucarda (1977)

Alucarda, directed by Mexican horror director Juan Lopez Moctezuma, is a retelling of the classic gothic horror novella Carmilla. Alucarda (say it backward), an orphaned teenage girl with frightening powers who lives at a convent, strikes up a very close relationship with the new girl at the convent. Eventually, they form a blood pact with each other and start practicing black magic and get into all sorts of bloody, nude trouble. Alucarda tackles issues of sexual repression and Catholicism, but the film is focused on creating a crazy viewing experience with a ton of gore and nudity.

mexican horror

Santa Sangre (1989)

Alejandro Jodorowsky is a pioneer of avant-garde and surreal film. This Chilean-French director is particularly known for films like El Topo, The Holy Mountain, and his failed attempt to film a 14-hour film adaptation of Frank Herbert’s Dune. He also directed the Mexican surrealist horror film Santa Sangre.

Santa Sangre is…a lot to take in. It’s the somber story of a woman who, horrifically abused and mutilated as a young woman, perpetuates psychological and emotion control over her son. This woman, Concha, though armless, can control her son’s hands and force him to murder the women who compete for his attention. It’s surreal and violent and archetypal and horrifying, overflowing with images that will haunt you for a long time.

mexican horror

Cronos (really, any of Guillermo del Toro’s Spanish language films) (1993)

Guillermo del Toro has achieved massive success in the United States, culminating with his recent Oscar win for Best Director for The Shape of Water. Before he was raking in the accolades for his English language films, del Toro was a talented young director writing and directing Spanish-Language films.

His very first Mexican feature film, Cronos, was released in 1993 and has all the elements that would become part of his signature brand of storytelling. In Cronos, del Toro breathed new life into vampire mythology with the story of an elderly antique dealer who stumbles upon an otherworldly device that bestows eternal life on its owners for one small price—becoming a blood-sucking vampire. Little does he know the significance of the object and what other more powerful men want with it. Del Toro combines the classic tropes of vampire tales with his own affinities for Mexican magical realism, dark fairy tales, and the religious questions we dare not ask ourselves.

mexican horror

We Are What We Are (2010)

Did you know that 2013’s critically acclaimed We Are What We Are is a remake of a Mexican horror film? The plot is the same—the patriarch of a cannibal family dies unexpectedly and leaves his family struggling to continue their, um, lifestyle. It’s a very gruesome, disturbing film, one that explores suppressed sexualities, stifled anger, shared shame, dysfunctional family dynamics, corruption of officials, and socio-economic hierarchies. It’s a compelling family drama and grisly horror film rolled up together.

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SXSW Prestige and Schlocky Flicks for April Horror Movies

I. Am. Pumped. April horror is chock full of all sorts of festival horror movies I’ve been waiting for, and they look great!

This April, we’re getting not one, not two, but three horror movies from last month’s SXSW, and they look amazing. I can already confirm that A Quiet Place, starring Emily Blunt and John Krasinski, is very good and highly enjoyable. That leaves Wildling, one of the festival’s unexpected triumphs, and Ghost Stories, a spectacularly moody British ghost tale.

And then, on top of everything, Marrowbone, the latest effort from Spanish filmmaker Sergio G. Sanchez (El Orfanto) drops this month. Swoon.

Also among the April horror releases are a few horror films that look cheesy, contrived, and quite frankly, delightful! Truth or Dare promises the kind of schlocky teenage horror we all secretly enjoy (don’t lie) while Bus Party to Hell demands to be seen on the strength of its title alone. I will oblige.

Seriously, this is a great month for both quality horror and popcorn-flick fun.

Check out the trailers below.

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