Stories For Ghosts

Horror for the Discerning Fan

Category: Films (page 1 of 6)

My List of Most Anticipated Horror Films for 2019

A new year, a new slate of horror movies to anticipate. This year, as with nearly every year, there are so many horror films to choose from. And as with every year, there are some movies that look DOA (like La Llorona, which looks so cheesy) as well as some films that will blow us all away (Jordan Peele’s Us looks way intense, I’m ready but so unprepared at the same time).

That being said, this year’s anticipated horror list includes a whole lot of sequels (4 total) and remakes (2 total). 2019 is the year of Stephen King, as his stories have inspired THREE of the fourteen movies on my list. But there’s also a fair bit of original content, like Us, Brightburn, and Ma.

I’m just so excited to see all of these. As always, stay tuned for my reviews of these films! Enjoy!

Continue reading
Share

January 2019 Horror Movies – Not a Bad Way to Start the Year

Happy New Year to all you horror fans out there!

I don’t know about you, but 2018 was kind of an amazing year for horror. There were a lot of original titles and a fair bit of inventive stuff. Of course, each month we saw many of the same old bad horror movie titles, with shoddy special effects, unimaginative jump scares, and laughable acting. Despite the highs we experienced in 2018, it appeared that each month would bring an endless stream of subpar horror movies.

I went into this month’s horror movie calendar feeling the same way. 2019 would be, largely, the same, and all I could do was hope we’d have the same caliber of cool horror movies as in 2018.

But then! These January 2019 horror trailers weren’t that bad. Some of them were actually, dare I say, interesting? Take Rust Creek, which might be a more sophisticated execution of your typical redneck survival horror movie. Or Pledge, which promises to unleash a whole frat of Patrick Bateman psychopaths on a group of unsuspecting underclassmen. And then, of course, there’s Glass, which isn’t really a full horror film, but by God, James McAvoy’s Beast character creeps me the hell out.

There’s also the notable horror DVD releases this month—Halloween will hit Amazon on January 15, followed by Suspiria on January 29. Both of these 2018 horror films are solid choices, so check them out.

And enjoy this month’s new horror releases!

Continue reading
Share

My Christmas Wishlist for Horror Movies to Remake

“Remake”—the very word inspires the most dramatic of eye rolls for horror fans. That’s because so many horror remakes are unnecessary. All too often, remakes are based on films that were wonderfully crafted, and some producer somewhere is trying to make a quick buck by dragging a good movie’s legacy through the mud.

Seriously, how frustrating is it when a solid, well-made horror classic, like 1982’s Poltergeist, gets remade? Poltergeist didn’t need a remake! And if someone just had to remake it, couldn’t they have created something better than the 2015 remake?

But then, again, how cool is it when a horror remake actually adds to or improves upon the original horror film? As much as I love Dario Argento’s Suspiria, it has its flaws. Luckily, the remake of Suspiria paid homage to the original, avoided copying the original’s aesthetic, and dove deep into the plot. What resulted was an original film that preserved the original’s legacy and stood on its own.

Or take the most recent news about the remake of Candyman, a good film that could have been great. It’s set to be produced by Jordan Peele and promises to dig into the power of the Candyman mythos against the backdrop of the now-gentrified area where the Cabrini-Green housing projects once stood. With Peele at the helm, I’m optimistic that this remake will cover a lot of new ground when it comes to racism and class differences, which is sadly very relevant.

That got me thinking—what are some other horror films that deserve a remake? What are some films that were good but not great, full of potential that shouldn’t be wasted? For whatever reason, be it a shoe-string budget, uneven writing, or production troubles, tons of horror movies never reached their full potential despite having most of the parts to do so.

Continue reading

Share

Suspiria Review: A Mesmerizing Reflection on Abuses of Power

*Warning: Some Spoilers for Suspiria*

When I walked out of the theater after watching Luca Guadagnino’s remake of Suspiria, I didn’t know what to think. I didn’t know how to feel. I didn’t know if I liked the movie or if I hated it. Oh sure, there was plenty of horrific elements and beautiful dance scenes and provocative imagery, but did I enjoy it? Was it a good movie?

And then I realized that I felt the same way after watching Dario Argento’s original Suspiria. I had to laugh. Even though the remake of Suspiria is a wholly independent film that stands on its own, it reminded me of the original in more than one way. Beyond the purposefully muted visual palate, the expanded plot, and the exploration of themes, Guadagnino’s Suspiria creates a similarly enigmatic and overwhelming horror film that compliments Argento’s work.

Continue reading

Share

November Horror: Suspiria, Overlord, and A Christmas-Themed Zombie Musical

It’s officially November, which means that we’ve got a whole new slate of horror movies to discuss while steadily munching on leftover candy.

The months after October were usually devoid of quality (or even interesting) horror movies because the holiday season is the domain of awards seasons hopefuls. But that’s changed in recent years as more and more studios realize there is a year-round audience for horror.

As such, there’s a not-terrible slate of horror movies to choose from this November. Based on trailers alone, highlights include Luca Guadagnino’s stylish remake of Dario Argento’s classic Suspiria, WWII occult-horror Overlord, and zombie-musical-comedy Anna and the Apocalypse. (I’ve been waiting for that last one since I first learned about it at FantasticFest 2017! I never knew how badly I wanted a Christmas-themed zombie musical until then.) But November also has a large number of stinkers, like The Amityville Murders (can they stop with this franchise already? Lord have mercy), The Farm, and The Possession of Hannah Grace.

Enjoy, and let me know what you think in the comments!

Continue reading

Share

What Horror Mega Hit Will Come from TIFF 2018?

Today is the official start of the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), which marks the unofficial beginning of “prestige movie season”! Every year, major studio and indie films vie for spots on the TIFF line-up in the hopes of garnering buzz and positive reviews to hype their releases. They’re also hoping for the kind of critical acclaim that wins films prestigious awards.

Unlike some other festivals of this caliber, TIFF always makes room for horror movies in their lineup. In recent years, TIFF has showcased films like The Grudge in 2002, Hostel in 2005,  Inside (À l’intérieur) in 2007, 2008’s The Loved Ones, Black Swan in 2009, The Lords of Salem in 2012, and Raw in 2016. Last year, TIFF screened mother!, Veronica, The Ritual (loved that movie!), Mom and Dad, and of course, Guillermo del Toro’s Oscar-winning The Shape of Water.

This year, TIFF has an impressive slate of horror movies, from the highly anticipated Halloween to quieter entries like The Wind. I can’t wait to see which ones will make a splash!  Read on to see the full line-up!

Continue reading

Share

September 2018 Horror – Attack of the Sequels and Some Indie Flicks

Do you feel that change in the air? In Texas, it’s no longer 100 degrees every day, and the mornings almost feel…pleasant? It must be fall!

Now that summer is drawing to a close, we’re less than 60 days out from Halloween! That means we’re about to get a whole slew of horror movies in anticipation of our favorite holiday.

And boy, does September deliver a bunch of horror movies. The quality of these movies varies, but there are some exciting choices here, like Nic Cage’s metal-horror Mandy and the religious-horror film Don’t Leave Home. Due to a crowded October release schedule, we also get a lot of big-name horror films this month, like sequels The Nun and The Predator. There’s also The House with a Clock in Its Walls, which might go on to become a kids’ horror classic.

Let’s get to it!

Continue reading

Share

The Good, The Bad, and The Weird – August Horror Releases

There are a ton of new August horror releases this month, and a wide variety at that! That’s what I’m talking about! This broad array of new horror is what I’ve been missing from the last few months—a mix of big-budget wide releases, artsy indie flicks, and some bizarre low-budget films.

I’m excited for zombie-apocalypse film Patient Zero, as well as the moody, ghostly gothic thriller The Little Stranger. And of course, I can’t wait to see The Meg, because who doesn’t love a ridiculous action-horror movie about sharks?

Check out all of the August horror releases below! Enjoy!

Continue reading

Share

2018 June Horror Movies – I Really Only Care About Hereditary

You guys. I can’t believe how short the June horror movie slate is this month! I mean, don’t you think you’d want to spread your summer horror releases out? Guess not, because June is sparse this month. There are only two major theatrical releases and a few VOD releases.

Though, to be fair, June horror has the incendiary Hereditary, fresh off the indie festival circuit and burning up the internet with tons of critical acclaim. That alone makes up for the shortage of other major horror titles and the duds rounding out June horror movies, like The Toybox and Ghostland. So I guess we can call it even?

There’s always July, when The First Purge and The Nun come out!

In the meantime, check out these trailers.

Continue reading

Share

9 of My Favorite Prom Horror Movies

Ah, the Prom Horror Movie. The guiltiest of my guilty pleasures!

They’re so cheesy, so campy, so over-the-top and wonderfully bad, though not always. Some prom horror movies have unexpected depth and nuance, exploring (sometimes clumsily) the dynamics of high school and the pressures of being a teenager. Just like the high school horror movie, the prom horror movie fumbles towards peering at the dark underside of the high school experience as memorialized in high school’s forever hyped event.

It makes total sense that prom is a big deal. In high school, especially the closer to graduation they are, teenagers find themselves stuck in a weird, awkward limbo where they don’t have the rights and privileges of an adult but know enough to want them, where the responsibilities and obligations of adulthood loom on the horizon. The intense desire for agency, meaning, and purpose melds with teenagers’ immature assumptions that agency, meaning, and purpose can be found in one glitzy, epic night.

Of course, it rarely happens that way. Prom night is almost never the incredible, life-changing event that Hollywood movies would have you believe. Most of the time, you get all dressed up in your high school best and spend a few hours swaying on the dance floor or sitting at your table with your friends, wondering why your crush hasn’t noticed how awesome you look. And then a drunk junior pukes Malibu all over the dance floor, and you and your friends leave and go to Denny’s on the way to someone’s house to watch Donnie Darko and try to sneak beer out of the garage refrigerator.

Continue reading

Share
« Older posts

© 2019 Stories For Ghosts

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑